©   greg   hannan|   hannangregory@gmail.com   902 825 3534 | Nova Scotia  | Canada  
Hannan Greg
I am a narrator. Stories have always served as the impetus for my work. In the span of the last forty years I have divided my time between Washington, D.C. (my birthplace) and two distinct locations in Nova Scotia: on an island in the mouth of the Bay of Fundy, and on a farm in the Annapolis Valley. In recent years I have worked in a series of residencies in Ireland, and in 2004 I became an Irish citizen. In 2013 I left Washington, D.C. and now maintain permanent residence in Nova Scotia. I am still a U.S. citizen. What began as a documentation of incidents and individuals has transformed over time to bear witness as to how both environment and genetics sustain the persistence of archetypal behavior. In most cases 'primary' sources have evoked my response. There has always been a considerable drift in time, often measured in years, with either story or physical material held in abeyance until they 'meet'. As a result, all methods in evidence here, whether two or 3-dimensional, regardless of execution date, remain active, and there will always be a backlog. This site represents a majority of my output to date. I confess to being baffled by the notions of 'signature' and 'tactic'. Perhaps I've escaped those inculcations so in evidence elsewhere by not availing myself of academic pursuits in the fine arts. My academic base, incomplete as it is, was in anthropology. My life's training retrospectively can be described as forensic in nature and what has been refered to here in that vein belies what would be a more expansive document. Though there are distinct autobiographic incidents, the intention of my work continues to be about 'the other'. There will not be a memoir if for no other reason than the inevitable harm done to others cannot be justified for the sake of ego. If there has been any tactic employed here, it is manifest in the form of a once subconscious dictum: that I work within the geographies of my own lineage.
photo by Richard Mosse for Tyrone Guthrie Centre